Rabbi Debbie Young-Somers

Ki Tavo

Over the summer, there was a noticeable rise in the purchasing of eye makeup, and a distinct decline in lipstick purchases. Knowing that our Bar Mitzvah boy, Freddy, has a keen eye for business, I was struck by this report last week, into a rather niche area of our shopping habits over the last few months. With masks covering our mouths and noses, this shopping trend is not surprising, though it’s not something I had given much thought to. Makeup may not be your thing Freddy, but this is the kind of niche business opportunity that could really make a venture work. Responding to the reality of mask wearing has impacted the market value of items that might seem totally disconnected to Covid 19 and an international pandemic.

Rabbi Debbie Young-Somers

Beha’alotecha

Until last November, if you had asked me what the most powerful museum I have visited was I would have unfalteringly replied Yad Vashem, the National Holocaust Museum in Israel. A place I have wept, learnt, and memorialised. But last year, I was attending a conference in Atlanta, the home town of Martin Luther King Junior, and visited The Centre for Civil and Human Rights. It didn’t tell a story I have been directly impacted by, as Yad Vashem does, yet it had a similar impact. Growing up in the UK I was of course aware of some of the history of slavery and civil rights in the US, but the Centre in Atlanta was so beautifully curated that not only did I learn some of the horrifying depths and lengths of this awful, oppressive history, I was able to feel it, and to weep.